Armed Citizen Project Aims to branch out to Tucson

Thursday, April 11, 2013 | Shaula Clark | NonProfitQuarterly.org
In the wake of a year that included several gun massacres, including the one at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., many anti-gun violence groups have stepped up to speak out against lax firearms regulations. But one nonprofit group is taking a wildly different stance on the issue: the Armed Citizen Project (ACP) wants to hand out free shotguns.

The organization’s efforts come as part of their national campaign to deter crime by “empowering neighborhoods,” including those in such cities as Houston, Dallas, Indianapolis, Chicago, Detroit, New York, and – most controversially – Tucson, where the memory of the 2011 shooting rampage that critically wounded then-Rep. Gabrielle Giffords is still quite raw.

On its website, the Armed Citizen Project describes itself as “a nonprofit organization that is dedicated to training and arming residents in mid-high crime areas with defensive shotguns, for free! In training and arming law-abiding residents, we are saturating neighborhoods with defensive weapons, and measuring the effect that a heavily armed society has on crime rates.”

According to the Associated Press, ACP founder Kyle Coplen, a 29-year-old University of Houston graduate, says, “It is our hypothesis that criminals have no desire to die in your hallway. We want to use that fear.” So far, the ACP’s efforts in Arizona have raised $12,500 and Tucson’s ACP organizer, Shaun McClusky, has announced his intention to start distributing guns by May. The dissonance between ACP’s mission of promoting safety while also handing out instruments of death is a jarring one to gun control advocates. But will it signify a trend?

Join the Community

Join Us

(required)
(required)
(required)
(required)
(required)
(required)
(optional)
No purchase or donation necessary. Void where prohibited. Receipt of prize subject to applicable local, state and federal law, including on the transportation of firearms, and winners compliance with any and all local, state, and federal laws related to receipt of such a prize.

Share